VP2771 Has Won Tom’s Hardware Editor Recommended Award

  • - Tom's Hardware
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For several years, we included only monitors with Adobe RGB gamuts in our definition of the professional category. But lately it seems that some displays are fitting that description with only an sRGB colorspace. They offer everything else a working pro could need, like factory calibration, lots of color adjustment options, and high quality IPS panels with solid build quality. Their advantage is that they cost less. sRGB screens with white backlights are often priced at less than half their wide-gamut counterparts.

Normally, we'd relegate monitors without Adobe RGB to the premium business class category. But we’ve expanded our rules to include products that include a factory calibration and are focused on color that conforms to industry standard specifications. Today we’re looking at ViewSonic’s VP2771. It’s a 27” monitor with factory-certified preset color modes, a 14-bit internal lookup table, and an optional calibration kit that can create custom setups for just about any purpose.

The VP2771 is an sRGB display with extended bit-depth courtesy of that 14-bit internal lookup table. It has preset modes for sRGB, Rec.709, EBU, SMPTE-C, DICOM-SIM, and even iPhone. Factory certifications are included for the first four standards with color and white point errors under 2dE with correct gamma tracking. In addition, the monitor features ViewModes for different game types, movie watching, and other common tasks. You can also calibrate it yourself using the OSD or, with an optional kit, create up to three custom modes that are stored internally.

The base panel is an IPS part with QHD resolution and white LED backlight. The chassis sports solid build quality that befits a monitor with these intentions. It should certainly have appeal as a professional’s tool as long as you don't need an extended gamut. Does it measure up to its impressive specs? Let’s take a look.

Packaging, Physical Layout & Accessories

ViewSonic packs all its monitors in oversized cartons with large foam blocks surrounding the contents. The VP2771 comes partially assembled. Once unpacked, just hook the panel on the upright and install four screws. Yes, you will need a Philips-head screwdriver; no snap-ons here.

The cable bundle includes only DisplayPort-to-mini and USB 3.0. There is no HDMI. You’ll need the latter to use the calibration kit, which is an add-on option. Our sample included it in the box. It’s called Colorbration and comes with an i1 Display Pro and the appropriate software. It’s based on X-rite’s application that we’ve seen shipped with some Dell and Samsung monitors. It can create custom calibrations and save them to one of three internal memories. We’ll detail its use on page

Product 360

The front layer is the same 3H-hardness plastic found in most LCD monitors today. It’s precisely fitted to provide maximum clarity through a small air gap. There was no light bleed on our sample. In fact, it had exceptional uniformity out of the box.

The bezel is extremely narrow at just 7mm on the top and sides. You can put multiple panels right up against each other with a very thin line between images. The bottom frame is wider at 13mm and features touch-sensitive controls at the right. They’re marked by tiny white lights that glow at an ideal level for visibility in dark or bright work environments. The power LED is a traditional blue. The controls respond to light pressure and are very precise.

The side view reveals a slim panel at a bit over two inches. There are no USB ports on either edge; they are found on the bottom input panel instead. Around back you’ll find ViewSonic’s familiar power bulge with generous ventilation across the top. There are no speakers built into the VP2771, but if you want sound, there is a headphone output on the bottom. The upright unbolts to reveal a 100mm VESA mount.

The input panel, starting at left, features one upstream and three downstream USB 3.0 ports. You’ll have to connect the monitor to your computer if you intend to use the Colorbration kit. Next is a USB-C port, which can carry video signals. The next two DisplayPorts are version 1.2; one is of the mini variety. Then you have a DisplayPort output for MST daisy-chaining. Finally, you can see the headphone output and the jack for the external power supply.

All the images or videos within the product screens herein are simulated for demonstration purposes only; they may not be the actual images or videos displayed in the products screens.